EMDR – Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing

When talking through the trauma is too difficult, but you are still reliving the traumatic event repeatedly, EMDR can help.

Counseling ABQ teams comprise EMDR and Trauma therapists who understand how trauma can impact your life.

EMDR – Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing

When talking through the trauma is too difficult, but you are still reliving the traumatic event repeatedly, EMDR can help.

Counseling ABQ teams comprise EMDR and Trauma therapists who understand how trauma can impact your life.

EMDR – Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing

When talking through the trauma is too difficult, but you are still reliving the traumatic event repeatedly, EMDR can help.

Counseling ABQ teams comprise EMDR and Trauma therapists who understand how trauma can impact your life.
Counseling ABQ

EMDR – Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing

Talk therapy is an excellent intervention for many types of issues. However, EMDR is another intervention we use when talk therapy doesn’t help clients to make fundamental changes.

If you have gone through a painful experience, you may find it challenging to feel safe and stable. You may feel as though you are stuck reliving the traumatic event over and over again.

This can especially happen when faced with a sight, sound, smell, or other sensation similar to your traumatic experience, bringing you back to the terror you felt.

You may feel exhausted by the need to stay hypervigilant, but you can’t stop fearing that you’ll be hurt again. You may feel ashamed of what happened and wonder if you are to blame. You may feel afraid of being alone but also find it difficult to trust others.

Disturbing events often stay with us. One moment can freeze in time; images, sounds, smells, and feelings can feel like they are happening right then, and the threat never ends. These memories can interfere with how you related to others and see the world. They can also make it difficult to be present, sustai relationships, concentrate.

Intellectual and emotional processing occurs in different areas of the brain. Even though you may know that you are “okay,” that is not necessarily how you feel. You may know that you are a good person and you are safe; you may feel “different,” “vulnerable,” and even “stupid.”

EMDR helps connect what you know to be true to what you feel about yourself. The brain processes the past trauma and begin to heal.

EMDR helps people let things go. Eventually, you no longer relive the trauma. You can still recall the incident, it will longer upset you or interfere in your life.

Counseling ABQ EMDR therapists can help you heal from the past and move forward with your life.

FAQ

Common Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About EMDR
No, it will not erase your memories. However, with the help of one of our trained EMDR therapists, disturbing or traumatic memories are reprocessed in our nervous systems, so people remember the events but no longer are emotionally reactive when triggered.
There are many different theories about how and why EMDR works. One of the most widely accepted is that traumatic memories are “stuck” in the amygdala-hippocampal complex, and when triggered, they seem to occur in the present. “Stuck” memories are thought to be unprocessed memories.

During EMDR, therapists move your eyes from side to side while you focus on a fragmented traumatic memory.

Some researchers liken this to the side-to-side eye movement we experience during sleep. EMDR rapidly allows us to process stuck traumatic memories as we would normally do with less traumatic memories during sleep.
During EMDR therapy, you will focus on a disturbing memory, or specific problem while also focusing on a set of bilateral stimulations (example: eyes moving back and forth vertically). After each set, you will share anything that come up (pictures, thoughts, feelings, body sensations, etc.) with your therapist. You will continue to do sets of eye movements until the memory becomes less disturbing and the beliefs about yourself have changed. This could take one session or several sessions. There is no “right way” to do EMDR therapy.
EMDR can work in conjunction with standard psychotherapy or be used as a treatment all by itself. You can see your EMDR therapist or a different therapist.