Anger Managment

Anger is a normal emotion. It is not good or bad. It conveys a message to you. It tells you if something is upsetting, wrong, or threatening. However, if you’re expressing your anger in a way that makes it worse for everyone, including yourself, don’t let it go on any longer. Our counselors are here to help you get back on the right track again.

Anger Management

Anger is a normal emotion. It is not good or bad. It conveys a message to you. It tells you if something is upsetting, wrong, or threatening. However, if you’re expressing your anger in a way that makes it worse for everyone, including yourself, don’t let it go on any longer. Our counselors are here to help you get back on the right track again.

Anger Management

Anger is a normal emotion. It is not good or bad. It conveys a message to you. It tells you if something is upsetting, wrong, or threatening. However, if you’re expressing your anger in a way that makes it worse for everyone, including yourself, don’t let it go on any longer. Our counselors are here to help you get back on the right track again.
Counseling ABQ

Anger Management

Anger management is learning to recognize signs that you’re becoming angry. Then, you learn to calm down and deal with the situation productively.

It is not suppressing your anger or turning it inward. Anger management aims to reduce unwanted feelings and act positively while handling your anger.

Instinctively, when we are angry, we respond aggressively. Often, these feelings allow us to defend ourselves if we are attacked. However, we can’t physically or verbally lash out at everyone who annoys or irritates us. Most of the time, people do feel guilty after such episodes. Overall, people do not want to hurt others. And no one wants to feel out of control. Learning to calm down is a healthy way to control your behavior and feelings. It will lower your heart rate and allow your senses to subside. When you get angry, the decision-making part of your brain shuts down. You may often make bad decisions when angry because of this. When you calm down, you can move on to identifying your thoughts and unmet needs that lead up to your angry feelings. Then, you will be able to express yourself assertively.

Being assertive is an excellent way to handle your anger. Being assertive is not demanding or pushy. Assertiveness means respectfully expressing anger and needs to others.
Counseling ABQ

Strategies to Reduce Anger

Strategies to Reduce Anger

Take some breaks during the day when things get stressful. It’s just a few minutes of quiet time to help you prepare to handle what is ahead. Timeouts just aren’t for kids.

Exercise

  1. Reduce stress by doing physical activity.
  2. If you feel yourself getting angry, go for a brisk walk or run.
  3. Find some kind of exercise that you enjoy.

Count to 10

Count to 10 or count from 10 to 1. If you’re outraged, start at 100 and count down. It takes time to slow your heart and clear your mind. Focus on the number you are on. Visualizing that number as you count to 10 or count down is helpful.

Practice Relaxation Skills

Practice deep breathing every day. Imagine a relaxing scene or repeat a calming phrase like “I’m okay. I’m taking it easy.” Practice this even when you’re not angry. Wire the skill into your brain. When you start to heat up, the skill is ready.

Think Before You Speak

It’s easy to blurt out your anger in the heat of the moment. Later, you’ll probably regret it. Take a few moments to decide what you’re going to say first.

Calm Down and then Express your Anger

  1. Wait until you think clearly.
  2. Express yourself in an assertive but not aggressive way.
  3. State your needs, but don’t try to control or hurt others.

Recognize if You Need Professional Help

Try the listed strategies. If your anger continues to spiral out of control, you’re hurting others, yourself, or breaking the law; you need more help. If you’re ready to make significant changes in your life and take control of your anger, check out our Anger Management Classes.
Counseling ABQ

Our Commitment to You

Your care and healing are our top priority. When experiencing life’s challenges, asking for support from family or friends can sometimes be difficult. We create a welcoming and non-judgmental space where we will support you through your challenges and celebrate the successes on your journey. Counselor ABQ therapists consider it a privilege to help others overcome the natural anxiety of starting treatment.

FAQ

Common Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About Anger Management
You probably don’t recognize the early signs of anger or can realize that certain situations can be triggering to you.

Anger can be a lot like a ball rolling down a hill. The further it gets, the more speed and force it accumulates. So, by identifying the subtle feelings in your body that you’re getting angry, it’s easier to stay calm before the ball is at full speed halfway down the hill.
Ask yourself some questions and see if anger is controlling your life:

  • Do you lose your temper quickly?
  • Do you feel wrong about things you say when you are angry?
  • Does it feel like you get too upset over little things?
  • Does your burst of anger affect those around you?
  • Do you feel guilty about what you say or do?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you want to consider counseling. Feeling anger and anger controlling your life are two different things. Anger may be controlling your life and harming your relationships (and harming you).
  • Weakens short-term memory
  • Heart rate up
  • Glucose up
  • Blood pressure up
  • Incidence of cancer up
  • Migraines and headaches up
  • Blood flow down
  • Metabolism down
  • Eyesight down

Anger management therapy is different than traditional talk therapy. It’s more than just talking about what makes you angry. You will also learn techniques to understand your triggers and responses to anger, learn strategies to manage or diffuse it and change thoughts and attitudes related to anger. Here are a few steps in this process:

  • Identify triggers.
  • Change your thought patterns that fuel your anger.
  • Change your attitudes. Your therapist will help you examine the attitudes contributing to your anger outbursts.
  • Develop coping skills. Therapy can help you manage your emotions, control your behaviors, and develop skills to help you cope with situations that trigger your anger. 
  • Solve problems. Problem-solve with your counselor on how to respond when you’re angry. 
  • Improve communication. In therapy, you’ll learn to actively listen and express your feelings respectfully or assertively without being aggressive.
Counseling ABQ

What We Treat

Anxiety
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Panic Attacks
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Depression
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Anger Management
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